A poem for the Vidhyadhara

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Today marks the 30th anniversary of Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche’s parinirvana.

Although I never formally met you or experienced you in your nirmanakaya form, I’ve been blessed to be under the guidance of one of your students. My teacher has shared many wonderful stories and it is quite clear to see that you are very much alive in her heart and every moment. I did had a wonderful, powerful dream with you many years ago, one that I still remember vividly. I was in a line, a procession, heading towards you. You were giving everyone a blessing. I remember you were dressed in white robes, and thought how odd? I was used to seeing Tibetan monks in their marooned robes, although you left your robes behind some time ago. Then as I arrived in front of you, you placed your hand on my head as I bowed. Then, like a rush of electricity, I felt an energy come from my feet, up through my body and out of the top of my head! At this precise moment, my eyes opened wide, I gasped, and woke up from the dream! It was an amazing experience. When I shared it with my teacher, she laughed and said,

“I see Rinpoche visited you.”

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A poem for the Vidhyadhara,

In the dhatu of beginninglessness and endlessness

Thank goodness there is the death of concepts

And the deathlessness of basic goodness

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Whatever You Meet Unexpectedly, Join With Meditation

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The idea is that whatever comes up is not a sudden threat or an encouragement or any of that bullshit. Instead it simply goes along with one’s discipline, one’s awareness of compassion. If somebody hits you in the face, that’s fine…

Generally speaking, Western audiences have a problem with that kind of thing. It sounds love-and-lighty, like the hippie ethic in which “Everything is going to be okay. Everybody is everybody’s property, everything is everybody’s property. You can share everything with everybody. Don’t lay ego trips on things.” But this is something more than that… It is simply to be open and precise, and to know your territory at the same time. You are going to relate with your own neurosis rather than expanding that neurosis to others.

In a sense, when you begin to settle down to that kind of practice, to that level of being decent and good, you begin to feel very comfortable and relaxed in your world. It actually takes away your anxiety altogether, because you don’t have to pretend at all… There is so much accommodation taking place in you. And out of that comes a kind of power: what you say makes sense to others. The whole thing works so wonderfully. It does not have to become martyrdom. It works very beautifully.

 

From Training the Mind & Cultivating Loving-Kindness by Chogyam Trungpa , copyright 1993 by Diana Mukpo.

 

How to Meditate 2.0: Vogue’s Sally Singer Commits to Ten Minutes of Daily Silence

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In the ten minutes before 6 a.m., when New York outside is still dark and frozen, I am pajama-clad and in semi-lotus in my bedroom, perched on a rigid pillow atop a tufted chaise. My palms face upward on my knees. My gaze is downcast and just slightly forward, resting lightly on precarious piles of DVDs and a mad crumple of laundry. But I am not thinking about the dated messiness of my stuff, the slight chill from the window, the creaky inflexibility of my hips, the dryness of my hands, the irrefutable fact that it is still really, really early in the morning. I am counting my cycles of breath. I am silently offering compassion to my mentors and children. I am watching my concerns about love and commitment bubble up and deflate. I am summoning my many to-do lists and then dismissing them. I am counting even more cycles of breath. I am striving for self-awareness. I am waiting for my iPhone to make the sound of a glockenspiel.

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